Ethical Fashion Challenge

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$5,582 raised so far
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Sample social media posts

Social media post example to share your challenge! (Simply copy and paste any of the text below into Facebook or Instagram and ensure you tag us in @BaptistWorldAid and the brands you are wearing).

I’m taking the Baptist World Aid Ethical Fashion Challenge because I want to help end worker exploitation. For seven days I’ll be wearing outfits made up of ONLY SEVEN items from my wardrobe.

I’m supporting Baptist World Aid by creating awareness and raising funds to campaign for an industry where environmental protection, as well as human rights, are the standard and not the exception.

Too many people making our clothes are still underpaid, unsafe and mistreated. The average living wage in Dhaka, Bangladesh, where many of our clothes are made is roughly US$7 a day. Yet the vast majority of workers don’t event earn this much – it’s time for change! Please sponsor me for $7 a day. That’s $49 for the week to help end worker exploitation.
#ethicalfashionchallenge

Social Media Posts for Brands

In all your posting to brands, we encourage you to use your own words as much as possible as this will speak most sincerely to brands. However, to get you started we have provided the below templates to help you on your way.

If you’re wearing an item of clothing from a brand rated A-B:

Hey @clothingcompany. Today as part of the #EthicalFashionChallenge I’m wearing my favourite (dress/skirt/shirt/pants) from your brand.

I was pleased to see that you received an [A/B] grade in @baptistworldaid’s 2019 #EthicalFashionReport. I want to thank you for your commitment to protecting workers’ rights and encourage you to continue to do all that you can to ensure the clothes you sell are free from slavery, child labour and poverty level wages. I applaud the efforts you have taken so far and look forward to hearing of further progress!

If you’re wearing an item of clothing from an average rated/ brand rated C

Hey @clothingcompany. Today as part of the #EthicalFashionChallenge I’m wearing my favourite (dress/skirt/shirt/pants) from your brand.

I was interested to find out you received a [C] grade in @baptistworldaid’s 2019 #EthicalFashionReport. While you have clearly taken some steps to ensure an ethical supply chain, I would really like to be seeing you do more, especially around the areas of living wages, supplier transparency and environmental impact.

As a customer I encourage you to do more and be more transparent with consumers like myself so that I may consider your efforts when making my next purchase.

If you’re wearing an item of clothing from a brand rated D-F:

Hey @clothingcompany. Today as part of the #EthicalFashionChallenge I’m wearing my favourite (dress/skirt/shirt/pants) from your brand.

As much as I love your brand, I recently saw that you only received a [D/F] grade in @baptistworldaid’s 2019 #EthicalFashionReport. This is really disappointing and needs to improve! I am asking you to take stronger steps to ensure an ethical supply chain by improving your practices surrounding payment of living wages, supplier transparency, and environmental impact.

As a customer I am urging you to do more and be more transparent with consumers like myself so that I may consider your efforts when making my next purchase.

If you’re wearing an item of clothing by a brand that hasn’t been graded by us (example):

Day 3 of my #EthicalFashionChallenge: Today I’m wearing this (skirt/shirt/dress/pants) by @clothingbrand. Although @clothingbrand haven’t been graded in @baptistworldaid’s Ethical Fashion Guide, I’m inquiring:
How are you tracing the full supply chain for your products, including raw materials and inputs (fibres and fabrics)? How are you ensuring that all workers within your supply chain are receiving a fair living wage? And are you engaging in thorough social auditing processes to confirm all codes of conduct and human rights are being upheld in these places of employment?

Please, as a customer I am urging you to do all that you can and to be transparent with consumers so that we may consider your efforts when making our next purchase.

If you’re wearing a second-hand or vintage clothing item (example):

Today on day 4 of @baptistworldaid’s #EthicalFashionChallenge I’m wearing my favourite second-hand/vintage find from @[secondhandshop]. I found this gem [X] years ago in my local op-shop and have worn it as a wardrobe staple ever since! With over 6 tonnes of clothing sent to landfill every 10 minutes in Australia alone, it’s essential that we adopt a slower approach to fashion consumption. Only 15% of all clothing donated to charities is on-sold, with the overwhelming majority ending up in landfill. Purchasing second-hand garments is an easy way to participate as a consumer in encouraging a more sustainable slow fashion movement. Plus, it’s a whole lot of fun digging for that perfect unique find!

If you’re wearing an item of clothing home-made by yourself or someone you know (example):

Day 5 today of the #EthicalFashionChallenge and I’m wearing a home-made (dress/skirt/shirt/pants) sewn by myself! As part of @baptistworldaid’s aim to end worker exploitation in fashion supply chains, it’s important that people understand where their clothing comes from and how it is made. Just as I selected the fabric and sewed my dress, every item of clothing in your wardrobe is made through an intensive process of human labour. Each row of stitching is guided under a needle by a pair of human hands. Worldwide, over 60 million people are employed in the textile industry, the majority women. Exploitation is rife, and through this fashion challenge we hope to encourage companies to improve their traceability and transparency in their supply chains.

Note: If you are wanting to tweet, simply shorten the text to suit.

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